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Aug 30, 2013

Seven rules for avoiding plagiarism

These rules are based on MLA style guidelines.
            
1. Provide clear attribution of outside sources; this can be done with parenthetical citations, lead-in or signal phrases, or a combination thereof. Attributions may contain the name of the author and that individual's professional affiliation or the name of the organization that provided the information for your paper. Introductory phrases such as "Sheila Costas observes" or "According to the President's Initiative on Race" clearly identify your source and incorporate the information smoothly into your paper.
             
2. Identify all words and phrases taken from sources by enclosing them within quotation marks, unless those words or phrases are commonly used expressions or clichés.
             
3. Follow all quotations, paraphrases, and summaries of outside sources with appropriate and complete citations. You may omit a citation only when the information that you have included in your attribution is sufficient to identify the source in your bibliography and no page number is needed. Citations should immediately follow the material being quoted, paraphrased, or summarized.
            
4. Use your own words and sentence structure when you paraphrase. A paraphrase should capture a specific idea from a source but must not duplicate the writer's phrases and words.
             
5. Be certain that all summaries and paraphrases of your sources are accurate and objective. You must clearly distinguish your own views and ideas from those of your sources.
             
6. Include all of the sources cited in your paper in the Works Cited list that follows the body of your paper. Be sure that all of the required information for each entry is accurate and complete.
             

7. Provide documentation for all visual images, charts, and graphs from printed or electronic sources. Be certain to accurately record the URL for Internet sources so that your citation will be correct. Images, charts, and graphs require documentation whether they are "pasted" into your paper as illustrations or summarized within the text of your paper.